Rockstar Shoot Part 2 of 3 – Light Beam Tutorial

16 04 2011

For some shots adding beams of light can really create bring impact into your images.  The two images that you see here are examples where I felt that emphasising the light beams in Photoshop would be beneficial to the image.

In both images, when I was in the studio taking the shots, my eye could see the light beams better than the camera recorded them, so I felt it wasn’t really “cheating” to bring back what I experienced in the studio.

This tutorial utilises another of Calvin Hollywood’s techniques for “ray of light”.  I highly recommend his DVD tutorial called “Calvinize”.

The following tutorial shows how I post process this image of Daniel.  The emphasis is on how I process the background light with rays of light technique from Calvin.

This is a pretty advanced technique.  I hope you enjoy it.





Testing My Lumodi Beauty Dish

5 12 2010

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This weekend I took delivery of a Lumodi Beauty dish.  I managed to coax my youngest son into an ad-hoc modelling session with me in the lounge room so that I could get a feel for the light qualities of this particular modifier.  It’s a bit weird to get used to compared to say a shoot-through brolly or a soft box.  Feels as though it is less forgiving in terms of placement, however I do like the quality of the light from it.

I have two studio shoots coming up in the next week.  The one on Tuesday night is going to be very ambitious, but if it comes off it will be spectacular (stay tuned), and then a session on the weekend with two models where I am just focusing on head and shoulders shots.  This should allow me to really focus on lighting and working with the models.





Some Black And White Studio Shooting

15 08 2010

This past week has seen me doing a number of studio shoots in Black and White.  Today I did a fantastic workshop run by Daniel Linnet over at Sydney Photographic Workshops.  The workshop was called Studio Lighting and it was not only a blast, but incredibly insightful.   I’ve admired Daniel’s photography for ages (since I saw one of his presentations at North Sydney Camera Club about a year back).

Anyway today we spent the day in various low key and high key lighting setups and it was a blast.  We worked with a fantastic model called Rev who is quite a character and very photogenic.  I’ve got a great video shot of the workshop that I’ll post later this week when I can edit it up.

Last Monday night I went back into the studio for my second shoot in the Bodyscape series.  This is Desiree.  Last time I shot her arse (which was pretty damn fine), but this time I shot her lovely face as well.

If anybody wants tutorials posted on any of these shots, just holler and I’ll knock one up.

Brent





Tethered Shooting To A Wireless iPad – Very Cool!!!!!

2 08 2010

iPad Users… You are going to LOVE this posting!!!!!

When the iPad was first announced, I was very excited about the using this device for photography.  Besides the obvious benefits of displaying photos, I imagined using the iPad as a tethered monitor for high resolution display of images in the field without having to lug a laptop around.  Alas, I was disapointed to hear that there was no USB connection on the first model.  While I love my iPad I had all but given up the thought of using it as a convenient high resolution monitor for tethered shooting.  Then all of a sudden I had a brain wave about how I could make this work.  When I tested it out, it worked like a treat.   I haven’t seen any mention of this on the internet anywhere, so hopefully this blog posting will help other photographers turn their iPad into a super convenient wireless monitor for tethered studio sessions.   Check out this video which will show it to you in action.

How Does It Work?

This should work with any Canon or Nikon camera

It definitely works with a Mac, however I’m not sure if there is an equivalent solution for Windows.

Here’s what you need.

  1. Camera (I know it will work with Nikon and Canon, but probably other brands as well)
  2. USB cable that you would normally use to shoot tethered.
  3. Mac Computer (Works fine on a Mac Pro laptop, iMac etc.)
  4. Tethering software (that runs on the Mac) I am using Lightroom 3, but you could also use Sofortbild or Canon tethering software.
  5. Air Display Software for the Mac (free) from Avatron
  6. Air Display Application for iPad ($9.99) from the AppStore on your iPad

Start by installing Air Display on your iPad.

Then download the Air Display Application for your Mac from Avatron.  You can get this by clicking here.

Get Airdisplay working as an extended desktop first (pretty cool eh)?

If you don’t have a wireless network operating in your shooting location, then you can create an Ad-Hoc Network from your Mac.  This means you don’t need a wireless router to communicate with your iPad… Your Mac computer will talk wirelessly to the iPad without any other hardware.

Then I started my tethering software (in my case it was Lightroom 3) and I configured my virtual second monitor into Loupe mode

Once I started my tethered shooting session the images just appear beautifully on my iPad.

If you drag the tethering control window onto the virtual monitor on the iPad you can remote trigger the camera.

Now I just need to design a cool little holder for my tripod… any suggestions?

I hope you find this posting useful… look forward to your comments and reactions.

Brent

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